Browsing: Archaeology

Whether Neanderthals had the same cognitive abilities as fully modern humans has long been a matter of debate with many suggesting our species displayed more mental prowess, one area where Neanderthals were considered lacking was in the production of cave art. New findings from cave sites in Spain suggest that Neanderthals had nothing to envy in respect to their close cousins, our direct ancestors. Archaeological research across Europe has convincingly established that the ancestors of modern Europeans reached the continent around 45,000 years ago, this date not only matched fossils and tools found but also coincided with the earliest examples…

Archaeologists working on a project in western Cape York at the northern tip of Queensland have announced the confirmation of an extensive mound building culture in the region, responsible for hundreds of ceremonial burial mounds. The structures had been known about, indeed some were even built on, but were previously assumed to be natural features of the landscape. The mounds are so numerous that they stretch across at least 60 kilometres of the Mapoon coast, a remote, mostly indigenous, community in Cape York. Local indigenous families have expressed fears they are surrounded by ghosts, with some mounds being in the…

A Global Aboriginal  Australian Culture? The Proof at Göbekli Tepe (Originally published in New Dawn Magazine, July 2017) By BRUCE FENTON Scientists and independent researchers have publicly speculated on the purpose of the mysterious Göbekli Tepe megalithic complex in southern Turkey. The question that the experts seem unable to address is the identity of the builders. Having completed an in-depth investigation of human origins and early migrations, it is now appropriate to reveal my extraordinary findings – Göbekli Tepe is the product of Aboriginal Australian culture. The identification of the builders will likely be considered very controversial, as it should…

Accurate Dating of Bone Ornaments by scientists associated with the National Museum of Natural History in Paris. Details of the new dating were published in a paper for Cambridge University’s archaeology journal Antiquity (August 8th, 2017), the research team place modern humans at Brazil’s Santa Elina rock shelter significantly earlier than 20,000 years ago.  The Santa Elina rock shelter, in Central Brazil, is home to extraordinary rock art and evidence of lengthy occupation by the first Americans. Occupation of the site is dated to several different periods, suggesting that groups of hunter gatherers only dwelt at the site when climate favoured…

A recent investigation of stone-age rock art at a megalithic construction known as Hendraburnick Quoit, in Cornwall, has revealed that ten times the number of artistic markings are visible when viewed in moonlight or feeble sunlight from the south east. These mysterious markings are now exclusively revealed by Ancient News researchers to be coded star markers. [This article explores the conclusions reached in a new study, and offers the opinion of this writer as to the possible interpretations of some of the associated scientific findings]. They also discovered that pieces of quartz had been deliberately crushed and spread around the…

Debate over the first domestication of wolves has long been a contentious issue, new ancient DNA evidence supports a one-off occurrence sometime between 40,000 to 20,000 years ago. The history of the human domestication of wolves and the selective breeding that gave us ‘man’s best friend’ has long been dogged by controversy. Canine genetic research published in June 2016 supported the possibility of two separate domestication episodes, with wolves being first brought into service by modern humans living in East Asia followed by a similar process beginning in Europe – involving two distinct populations of wolves. The latest study examined…